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FROM THE DESK OF THE METALS EXPERTS

Welcome to the MetalTek Blog.

As your Metals Partner, it is our goal to educate you on various casting processes. Feel free to browse around to learn more but if you have questions or need to submit an RFQ, please contact us. MetalTek International. Because You Demand More Than Metal.

Red Brass Material Profiles

Posted by Dave Olsen on 2/23/16 1:32 PM

Grade

  • MTEK 844 (C84400) and MTEK 85-5-5-5 (C83600) Red brasses

Description

  • General utility alloys where reasonable strength and non-corrosive properties are demanded.  

Properties – Why select this material

  • Relatively light loads.
  • Good lubrication is possible.
  • Excellent machinability.

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Topics: Copper Based Alloys, Non-Ferrous, Red Brass

Bearium Alloys

Posted by Dave Olsen on 2/23/16 1:08 PM

For over 60 years, Bearium® Metals have been chosen for performance under the toughest operating conditions. These are high lead tin bronze alloys containing virgin copper, tin, and specially processed lead. Bearium® metals can be used where other bearing materials may fail due to speed, load, temperature, or where lubrication is difficult, impossible, or simply neglected. The high lead tin bronze for superior performance in particularly difficult applications and where lubrication is a challenge.

There are four grades available: B-4, B-8, B-10, B-11:

  • Bearium® B-4 is made up of 70% Copper, 4% tin, and 26% lead. This grade is used when the shaft or other mating part is relatively soft, is not heat treated or carburized, and has a hardness below Rockwell C20.
  • Bearium® B-8 consists up of 70% Copper, 8% tin, and 22% lead. It is recommended for use where the mating shaft or component has a hardness greater than Rockwell C20 or where the mating part has been heat treated or carburized.
  • Bearium® B-10 metal is 70% Copper, 10% tin, and 20% lead. Use of this version of Bearium® is recommended where the mating shaft or component has a hardness greater than Rockwell C20 or where the mating part is heat treated or carburized. It should be used in preference to the B-8 grade in applications which require somewhat higher physical properties than are available in B-8 material.
  • Bearium® B-11, the material with the highest strength within the Bearium® family, is made up of 70% Copper, 10% tin, 2% Nickel, and 18% lead. It has the lowest content of lead and offers the highest tensile and yield strength.
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Topics: Copper Based Alloys, Non-Ferrous, Bronze, High Lead Tin Bronze, Bearium Alloys

High Lead Tin Bronze Material Profiles

Posted by Dave Olsen on 2/23/16 12:55 PM

Grade

  • MetalTek 83-7-7-3 (C93200) (SAE 660) Bearing bronze

Description

  • This standard cast bronze-bearing alloy is used widely for a great many applications.

Properties – Why select this material

  • This alloy possesses good hardness, strength, and wear resistance.
  • Excellent anti-frictional qualities
  • Good casting properties.
  • Readily machined, broached or reamed.

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Topics: Copper Based Alloys, Non-Ferrous, Bronze, High Lead Tin Bronze

High Lead Tin Bronze

Posted by Dave Olsen on 2/23/16 9:07 AM

The high lead tin bronzes are superior bearing alloys when all properties and costs are considered. Four alloys constitute a representative group of materials most widely used for bearings and bushings:

  • MTEK 83-7-7-3 / C93200 (83% Copper, 7% Tin, 7% Lead, 3% Zinc)
  • MTEK 80-10-10 / C93700 (80% Copper, 10% Tin, 10% Lead)
  • MTEK 79-6-15 HI LEAD / C93900 (79% Copper, 6% Tin, 15% Lead)
  • MTEK 943 / C94300 (70% Copper, 5% Tin, 25% Lead)
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Topics: Copper Based Alloys, Non-Ferrous, Bronze, Tin Bronze, High Lead Tin Bronze

Tin Bronze Material Profile

Posted by Dave Olsen on 2/23/16 8:40 AM

Grade

  • MTEK 943 (C94300) Tin bronze

Description

  • Bearing alloy with the ability to operate at high speeds and light loads under adverse lubrication conditions.
Read More

Topics: Copper Based Alloys, Non-Ferrous, Bronze, Tin Bronze

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